Why do I have a bad bite?

A bad bite can take many forms—underbite, overbite, crossbite, or even as simple as dental crowding. It can also lead to an underdeveloped ‘mouth breather jaw.’

Many of us go years with a bad bite and never encounter problems. For others, though, a bad bite can cause a whole host of dental and health issues. 

Crooked teeth are harder to clean, making them more susceptible to dental cavities and gum disease. Misaligned teeth can also wear down faster, leading to broken teeth, crowns, loose teeth, sore teeth and the list goes on.

Misaligned teeth are often a sign of more significant problems like TMJ dysfunction, bad posture, and an inadequate airway.

So, we know these are all problems that should be addressed to ensure optimal dental health. But, the real question is, why are we all so screwed up, anyway?

We can look to the industrial revolution as the source of many of our modern day dental issues.

With all of the great and wonderful things that came out of the industrial revolution began some side effects that are not so desirable. Air pollution and processed, soft sugary foods being the worst offenders.

Air pollution leads to allergies in some people. Add to that allergies and sensitivities to dairy, wheat/gluten, soy, and corn means there are a lot of stuffy noses walking around! Allergies often mean stuffy noses and mouth breathing. Humans are designed to breathe through our noses.

When we have to breathe through our mouths because of stuffy noses, all sorts of things can happen. In adults, mouth breathing can lead to dry mouth induced dental cavities, gum disease, and increased snoring.

As a result underdevelopment of the midface or ‘mouth breathing face’ can make make your face appear longer due to improper growth patterns during development.

In kids, if mouth breathing continues longer than the occasional stuffy nose, jaw growth and development can be affected. With ideal nasal breathing, the tongue should be completely sealing in the palate.

The tongue muscle acts as a natural palate expander counteracting forces from the cheek muscles to ensure the jaw is big enough for the teeth to come in straight and for the jaw to develop to its full genetic potential.  

With mouth breathing, the tongue sits on top of the bottom teeth or even lower resting between the lower teeth on the floor of the mouth. In a developing child, this allows the forces of the cheek muscles to impede upper jaw growth and tooth eruption resulting in narrow arches, crowded teeth, midface deficiency or ‘mouth breather face’.

 

Overbite

Overbite

 

If the tongue is on top of the bottom teeth while they are erupting, they will not enter the mouth entirely causing a deep bite or an overbite.

 

Underbite

Underbite

 

If the tongue sits lower on the floor of the mouth, the bottom jaw grows larger than the top and results in an underbite or “bulldog bite”.

 

Crossbite

Crossbite

 

Crossbites can occur in either situation when the growth of the top or bottom jaw in uneven or an early tooth contact in the bite cause the jaw to shift to one side to avoid tooth pain.

 
 

Soft, sugary, processed foods are also an issue during growth and development. These types of food merely make us lazy chewers—we don’t have to work as hard to eat these things. It’s basically like not exercising. When we don’t use and work our jaw muscles as much as they need, our facial muscles don’t develop fully and are often weak. 


Why did our ancestors not have mouth breathing face?

Pre-industrial jaw and teeth   with plenty of room for wisdom teeth and support to avoid an underdeveloped jaw.

Pre-industrial jaw and teeth with plenty of room for wisdom teeth and support to avoid an underdeveloped jaw.

You can look to indigenous societies and our hunter-gatherer ancestors to see just what our jaws should look like—broad, no crooked teeth with plenty of room for wisdom teeth. There is little evidence of dental diseases like decay and gum disease in hunter-gatherer skulls as well!

Post industrial upper arch and teeth   of a mouth breather. The tongue wasn't on the roof of the mouth resulting in a narrow upper arch and crowded teeth.

Post industrial upper arch and teeth of a mouth breather. The tongue wasn't on the roof of the mouth resulting in a narrow upper arch and crowded teeth.

Post industiral lower arch and teeth   of of a mouth breather. Notice the tipped in back teeth from the tongue resting on them during eruption.

Post industiral lower arch and teeth of of a mouth breather. Notice the tipped in back teeth from the tongue resting on them during eruption.

The takeaway is that we need to do everything for our kiddos to ensure proper nasal breathing and adequate chewing.

A physiologic dentist like Dr. Randi Green can perform a detailed airway assessment and a thorough jaw growth and development evaluation in children as young as 12 months.

By catching these risk factors early, you can help your child develop to their full genetic potential and minimize their risk for dental problems later in life.

For adults, there is hope with Facial Growth Orthodontics!

Facial growth guidance orthodontics paired with myofunctional therapy can correct many bad dental bites and their associated issues for most patients.

Myofunctional therapy also helps to correct bad swallows, tongue thrusts, incorrect resting tongue position, as well as weak jaw and facial muscles. Dr. Green’s Physiologic Orthodontics can develop the jaws to their full genetic potential that was interrupted during their initial growth and development.


Contact us to see when Dr. Green can help you determine your candidacy for Facial Growth Orthodontics and if it’s the right solution for you. 

Call us (417) 887-5155